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Jul 20

likeafieldmouse:

Jim Mangan - Time of Nothing - The Great Salt Lake, Utah

(via thesonicscrewdriver)


(via rreturn)


arjuna-vallabha:

Flooded ruins at Angkor

arjuna-vallabha:

Flooded ruins at Angkor

(via rat-eyes)



“We live in an age where we feel guilt whenever we have to cut someone off but the reality is that some relationships do need to die, some people do need to be unfollowed and defriended. We aren’t meant to be this tethered to the people in our past. The Internet mandates that we don’t burn bridges and keep everyone around like relics but those expectations are unrealistic and unhealthy. Simply put, we don’t need to know what everyone else is up to. We’re allowed to be choosy about who we surround ourselves with online and in real life, even if it might hurt people’s feelings.” Thought Catalog (via dillondean)

(via bandiiful)


sixpenceee:

EVERYDAY THE SAME DREAM is an art game about alienation and refusal of labour. You are a faceless, unnamed man going about his business. The game has alternatives endings. Will you end up going to work and working in a little cubicle like every day, or will you take another route and do something different for once? 

PLAY IT HERE

You may also like: ENTITY

(via xizzzzy)


Jul 18

nowinexile:

"I’ll tell you what is harder than dying in Gaza by an Israeli missile deluxe. What is harder is that you get a phone call from the Israeli army telling you toevacuate your home because it will be bombed in ten minutes. Imagine; ten minutes; and your whole short history on the surface of Earth will be erased.

Gifts you received, photos of your siblings and your children (dead or alive), things that you love, your favorite chair, your books, that last poetry collection your read, a letter from your expatriate sister, reminders of the ones you loved, the smell of your bed, the jasmine tree that hangs off your western window, your daughter’s hair clip, your old clothes, your prayer rug, your wife’s gold, your savings; imagine; all this passes in front of your eyes in ten minutes, all that pain passes while you are struck by surprise.

Then you take your identification papers (passport, birth certificate, etc.) which you have ready in an old metallic candy box, and you leave your home to die a thousand times, or refuse to leave and die once.”

—a Palestinian in ‪#‎Gaza‬

(via heylookdisease)





unnewsworthy:

Ruppells Griffon Vulture, photgraphed by @chamiltonjames (Charlie Hamilton James).

unnewsworthy:

Ruppells Griffon Vulture, photgraphed by @chamiltonjames (Charlie Hamilton James).

(via gutcolour)


YouTube comments aren’t “just the Internet.” They’re not the product of a group of otherwise nice guys who suddenly become evil when they wear a veil of anonymity. YouTube comments are actually a nightmarish glimpse into the sexist attitudes that define the fabric of our own existence in the “real world,” a world that, like YouTube, is owned and dominated by men. The most terrifying gift that the Internet has given us is that it’s shown us how men honestly perceive the world: as a place where women exist exclusively for their sexual pleasure.

In the wake of VidCon, and as more and more women start speaking up about the harassment they face online, it’s time to start realizing that our narrative of progress is deeply flawed. Things aren’t getting better for women on the Internet; they’re deteriorating and ignoring the problem amounts to being complicit in it.

"For women on the Internet, it doesn’t get better" by Samantha Allen (via albinwonderland)

(via missespeon)


asylum-art:

Nicola Samori: The impressive Baroque paintings and some partially destroyed Nicola Samori.

Known for the smoldering intensity of his figurative work, and a dedication to preserving antiquated styles and themes in his paintings, Samorì deftly wields his artist’s brush to create moody and atmospheric pieces that weigh heavily both physically and metaphorically. The creation of each of his compositions is marked by ceremony before a systematic deconstruction. Samorì is most successful, however, in creating timeless pieces of art in spite of — or perhaps even because of — the heavy Baroque influence that runs throughout his body of work. They are as relevant today as they would have been in Michelangelo's — an obvious influence in Samorì's work — 16th century Italian Renaissance. The classical beauty imbued in each of his pieces is only surpassed by his technical aptitude. Samorì is, at the heart of it, a master storyteller and the work as enigmatic as the man.

(via xizzzzy)


hiclyd:

argentravel

hiclyd:

argentravel

(via zanylalochezia)


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